The impact of the maryland act concerning religion on americas idea of democracy

George died in and his son, Cecilus, or Cecil, Calvert, second Lord Baltimore, developed the colony and became its first proprietor.

The impact of the maryland act concerning religion on americas idea of democracy

Two Acts of Toleration: Mary's City, then the capital of Maryland, freemen gathered for a meeting of the General Assembly in the St.

Mary's room of Governor Stone's house, the foundations of which can seen today at Historic St.

Chapter 2 Flashcards Preview History > Chapter 2 > Flashcards Which colony adopted the Act Concerning Religion in , which institutionalized the principle of religious toleration? Which one of the following is an accurate statement regarding the impact on Maryland of 17th century England's Prostestant-Catholic conflict? Adopted in Maryland in ; institutionalized the principle of toleration that had prevailed from the colony's beginning Jamestown Capital of Virginia colony and funded by Virginia Company. The Maryland Act of Toleration is an important stepping stone to the religious freedom which became such an important characteristic of the United States. Resources: Adapted from an earlier Christian History Institute story. Wiersema, Garry. "An Act Concerning Religion." The .

Acting as representatives of the people, they were to consider sixteen bills for possible approval as laws of the province. Since many of the contemporary records have been lost, little is known today of all that happened in that session of the Assembly. Certain it is, however, that nineteen days later, on April 21, the freemen voted twelve of the proposed bills into law.

Among them was An Act Concerning Religion. From time to time, in the long struggle of the American people toward complete religious liberty, several colonies - especially Rhode Island and Pennsylvania - made notable contributions.

Maryland's gift to the common cause was this Act Concerning Religion-- one of the pioneer statutes passed by the legislative body of an organized colonial government to guarantee any degree of religious liberty.

Specifically, the bill, now usually referred to as the Toleration Act, granted freedom of conscience to all Christians. Then, inthe freemen had approved An Act Concerning Religion part of which stated that, "no person or persons whatsoever within this province.

The impact of the maryland act concerning religion on americas idea of democracy

The purpose of the vague religious clause in the charter he perceived with the utmost clarity. It was to prevent a repetition in the colony of the unhappy religious and political troubles prevalent in England.

Accordingly, he made every effort to impress upon his settlers the necessity for avoiding religious controversy. In Cecil Calvert submitted to the General Assembly a series of proposals, which, so he wrote in an accompanying letter, had been suggested to him - by whom we do not know.

The proposed sixteen laws, however, covered a range of subjects so wide that they may well have been designed for the primary purpose of strengthening his tottering position as Lord Proprietary of Maryland.

Among them was an act for punishing counterfeiters of the seal of the province, and another to punish offenders against the peace and safety of the colony. But most important of all - since politics and religion were closely interwoven - was An Act Concerning Religion.

The Maryland Assembly, whose membership by this time was about half Protestant, considered the proposals. Some of its more conservative members, no doubt, were as full of anxiety and foreboding as was Lord Baltimore back in England; to them the old order seemed to be collapsing before the strange idea of a government more responsive to the freemen's wishes.

But other members were feeling their power to create a government by the consent of the governed, and they showed it. They refused to accept His Lordship's proposals en bloc; four of them they rejected, and some of the remaining twelve they proceeded to rewrite. In the end, on April 21, they endorsed the bulk of them as substantially sensible, just and right.

The first of those approved was An Act Concerning Religion. From internal evidence it is clear that this was one of the bills partially rewritten. It begins with a terrific and lengthy blast against profane swearers, blasphemers, Sabbath breakers, and others of the ungodly. This section had nothing to do with the main purpose of the act, and it is reasonably certain that Baltimore did not write it.

If you like our content, please share it on social media!

It may even have been camouflage to obscure the latter section which granted toleration. However, to assume, as some have done, that the first section was a repudiation of the spirit of tolerance constitutes an unwarranted removal of the act from its historical setting.

Severe laws against blasphemy and similar crimes had been on the statute books of England and other European countries for generations.

In any event, the act was remarkably comprehensive. Its provision that no man should "be in any ways troubled, molested, or discountenanced for or in respect of his or her religion " was tolerance.

But it went further. In a previous clause, it imposed fines and imprisonment on anyone who should in a reproachful manner or way apply certain terms to other persons to disparage their religion.

This went beyond mere tolerance, and looked toward fellowship, understanding and complete freedom of conscience. True, toleration in Maryland temporarily was struck down only five years after its enactment.

Bythe conflict in England was over, but postwar hysteria flooded the colony like a tidal wave. Cromwell was seated firmly in England's saddle; only death would dislodge him. Zealous Maryland Puritans, caught in the emotional frenzy, swept away the Act of Toleration and put Catholics, Jews, Quakers, Atheists, and all dissenters under disabilities as oppressive as any imposed in America.

Introduction

In enacting this legislation, Maryland was among the world's leaders. It is an honor of which she cannot be deprived, and a great honor when one considers what followed.Maryland's gift to the common cause was this Act Concerning Religion-- one of the pioneer statutes passed by the legislative body of an organized colonial government to guarantee any degree of religious liberty.

Specifically, the bill, now usually referred to as the Toleration Act, granted freedom of . The Maryland Act of Toleration is an important stepping stone to the religious freedom which became such an important characteristic of the United States.

Resources: Adapted from an earlier Christian History Institute story. Wiersema, Garry. "An Act Concerning Religion." The .

ID: Act of Toleration is also called Act Concerning Religion. Because there was so much tension between the Catholics and the Protestants in the region of Maryland, Calvert, the governor, sent a draft of the an Act Concerning Religion from England to assure religious freedom for all Christians (must believe in the divinity of Jesus Christ), but.

Unfortunately, Protestants swept the Catholics out of the legislature within a decade, and religious strife ensued.

Chapter 2 Flashcards by Chantelle Smith | Brainscape

Still, the Act of Toleration is an important part of the colonial legacy of religious freedom that will culminate in the First Amendment in the American Bill of Rights. Maryland, named after England's Catholic queen Henrietta Maria, was first settled in Unlike the religious experiments to the North, economic opportunity was the draw for many Maryland colonists.

Consequently, most immigrants did not cross the Atlantic in family units but as individuals. The Toleration Act, it was believed, was a way of providing protection for Catholics while at the same time representing a nod in the direction of the English government, which in and for a dozen years thereafter was firmly under the control of the English Puritans.

Teaching American History in Maryland - Documents for the Classroom - Maryland State Archives